Skip to main content

Well for me it is very slow.  Recently, I upgraded from CentOS 6 to Centos 7.  CentOS 6 was lightening fast.  Since the upgrade CentOS 7 has been so slow in comparison.  But when I say slow, it has been appallingly slow.  It just was unable to reach anywhere the performance of 6.  Which seems odd, given high transmission speed and powerful hardware.   It still takes forever in executing or processing services or applications.

This is a fluid article that will outline the investigative works I have done in exploring what is happening with the server.

Your Linux computer seems to be slow because of some of the following reasons:

  • Many unnecessary services started or initialised at boot time by the init program
  • Many RAM consuming applications such as LibreOffice on your computer
  • Your (old) hard drive is malfunctioning, or its processing speed cannot keep up with the modern application

First command to check the performance of the server:

cat /proc/cpuinfo

processor   : 0
vendor_id   : GenuineIntel
cpu family  : 6
model       : 85
model name  : Intel(R) Xeon(R) Gold 6126 CPU @ 2.60GHz
stepping    : 4
microcode   : 0x2006906
cpu MHz     : 1783.196
cache size  : 19712 KB
physical id : 0
siblings    : 24
core id     : 8
cpu cores   : 12
apicid      : 16
initial apicid  : 16
fpu         : yes
fpu_exception   : yes
cpuid level : 22
wp          : yes
flags       : {flags listed here}
bogomips    : 5200.00
clflush size    : 64
cache_alignment : 64
address sizes   : 46 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

processor   : 1
vendor_id   : GenuineIntel
cpu family  : 6
model       : 85
model name  : Intel(R) Xeon(R) Gold 6126 CPU @ 2.60GHz
stepping    : 4
microcode   : 0x2006906
cpu MHz     : 1783.196
cache size  : 19712 KB
physical id : 0
siblings    : 24
core id     : 2
cpu cores   : 12
apicid      : 4
initial apicid  : 4
fpu         : yes
fpu_exception   : yes
cpuid level : 22
wp          : yes
flags       : {flags listed here}
bogomips        : 5200.00
clflush size    : 64
cache_alignment : 64
address sizes   : 46 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

processor   : 2
vendor_id   : GenuineIntel
cpu family  : 6
model       : 85
model name  : Intel(R) Xeon(R) Gold 6126 CPU @ 2.60GHz
stepping    : 4
microcode   : 0x2006906
cpu MHz     : 1740.920
cache size  : 19712 KB
physical id : 0
siblings    : 24
core id     : 3
cpu cores   : 12
apicid      : 6
initial apicid  : 6
fpu         : yes
fpu_exception   : yes
cpuid level : 22
wp          : yes
flags       : {flags listed here}
bogomips         5200.00
clflush size    : 64
cache_alignment : 64
address sizes   : 46 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

The above command display detailed information about your CPU such as vendor_id, model name, CPU MHz, cache size, bogomips and microcode.

Let’s go through some important details about CPU information.

  • model name: The model name indicates the manufacturer, model and speed of the CPU. In this case, we have an Intel(R) Celeron(R) Gold CPU processor number 6126 that has a speed of 2.60GHz
  • cpu MHz: cpu MHz(MegaHertz) is used to measure the transmission speed of channels, buses and the computer’s internal clock. In this case the transmission speed is 1740.920MHz
  • cache size 19.7GB
  • bogomips: simply means Bogus Millions of instructions per second. It is a standalone program that displays your system performance.  In the data above the bogomips is 5200.
  • microcode  0x2006906.  Microcode is a processor design technique that interposes a layer of computer organization between the CPU hardware and the programmer-visible instruction set architecture of the computer.  Simply a layer so that instructions can be designed and altered more freely